Conference

The 9th International Conference of Digital Archives and Digital Humanities

Theme of the Conference

Facing the Era of AI+DH

Scope & Objectives

The Digital Humanities is an emerging field of research, the term itself having only been coined in 2004. Notwithstanding the fact that research in this area is quite new, the digital humanities have been flourishing at an unprecedented rate. In recent years, whether in Europe, America, Asia or Taiwan, various research institutes and teams dedicated to research and development in the digital humanities have been established. This demonstrates the high level of interest in and importance attached to this field by the community.

The core concept of the field of digital humanities is the application of modern digital technologies to the disciplines of the traditional humanities, in order to overcome the limitations of traditional research methodologies. This combination of knowledge and technology, in an interdisciplinary manner, is unachievable in any single area. The development of the field of digital humanities is in fact indissociable from the progress of new digital technologies. These new technologies not only provide new methods of data analysis, but can also be used to create new types of digital resources.

In recent years, major breakthroughs have been made in the field of artificial intelligence. Various types of A.I. technologies have gradually evolved from theoretical speculation into concrete reality with practical applications, with remarkable results. However, to answer what the intelligence is makes A.I. deeply related to humanities. For example, Natural Language Processing technology in A.I. assembles an important subdomain of linguistics — computational linguistics. Besides, A.I. technologies which mimic the structure of human intelligence, such as the Semantic Web, Ontology, the Knowledge Graph, Linked Open Data, are based on the theory of ontology in philosophy.

What kind of applications and breakthroughs can these digital technologies bring to the digital humanities? How should humanities scholars view the results of an artificial intelligence based on digital resources? Compared to traditional humanities studies which only consider a limited corpus of text, artificial intelligence can process a large body of data, with the exception of a limited number of research methods. In the last analysis, do these new technologies provide more help for the study of the humanities, or are their results unconvincing? All these topics are subjects this conferences seeks to examine and discuss.

Given the growth of the field of the digital humanities, this conference will continue over the years to research every facet of the digital humanities, but will also include the topic of ‘Facing the Era of AI+DH’ as its theme. We invite scholars and experts, at home and abroad, to participate in this session, and look forward to creating new milestones in digital studies through dialog and exchange.


The 8th International Conference of Digital Archives and Digital Humanities

Theme of the Conference

Digital Humanities Evolving: Past, Present, and Future

Scope & Objectives

While the debates over the definition, landscape, and scale of digital humanities continue, digital humanists seem to have a consensus that digital humanities are constantly evolving and facing new challenges. Take big data as an example. Technologies automatically and instantly archive what people say, what people do, and even what people think. The rich information provided by big data leads humanities research to a new frontier that can hardly be imagined by classical humanists. However, the self-archived data contain real, virtual, and even fake contents. How shall digital archivists and digital humanists embrace big data and big data analytics? Alternatively, will the ubiquitous digitization transform human culture and make “digital humanities” simply become “humanities”?

Digitalization involves computing. Digital humanists share the same tools with computational social scientists to extract information, to analyze social network, and to perform geospatial analysis. Digital humanists have also attempted to apply the tools of computational social sciences to model and simulate the complex human experiences. In the meanwhile, computational social scientists are exploring sentiment modeling. When the research tools and topics of interest become common, how far can digital humanists and social scientists collaborate to gain deeper insights into common research problems and cope with shared challenges?

Continuing the legacy of the past 7 annual conferences of DADH, we welcome the submissions of paper or poster abstracts and panel proposals related to, but not limited to, the aforementioned issues, digital technologies and applications, interdisciplinary research in humanities and social sciences with the use of digital data, theoretical and epistemological considerations in digital humanities, digital humanities education, digital arts and music, digital infrastructure, cultural heritage, and internet analysis.


The 7th International Conference of Digital Archives and Digital Humanities

Theme of the Conference

Scope & Objectives

In the past few decades, the digitization of cultural heritage has become an integral part of cultural preservation and social development. More and more humanities disciplines and scholars also acknowledge digital humanities as a critical component in research and education. Starting from research centers on digital humanities, many universities are also developing educational programs, degrees, and departments on digital humanities. However, does this imply the arrival of digital scholarship as a new paradigm?

The theme of this year’s conference is “Digital Scholar, an emerging profession?”. We wish to explore the knowledge nature of digital humanities: how it is defined, created, disseminated through the dialogues between humanities and digital technology; how the communities are formed; how the researchers are and should be evaluated and recognized by the scholarly community at large; how and whether digital humanities, as a discipline, is emerging.

Past Conferences:

2015

2014

2012

2011

2010

2009